Is the Fan Site Dead?

Flavorwire

When I was growing up, all my precious computer time was dedicated to MuggleNet. Frequenting fan sites is just the kind of thing that you do when you are 12 years old and bored and not allowed to get a MySpace account. It was my first entry point into Internet culture, leading me down a rabbit hole that would basically construct my online existence throughout middle school and early high school. Fan sites have existed since the birth of the user-friendly Internet, offering a central place for fans of whatever  — video game, book, franchise, television show, movie, celebrity, you name it — to find each other, talk, read up on news and collectively geek out.

View original post 796 more words

Advertisements

Kathleen Hanna, on Feminism

Quote

To me, feminism is also about liberating men from the stereotypes that they have to be the breadwinners, that they have to be a certain way, and they can’t explore their feminine sides. That’s crippling men. That’s crippling how fully men can experience their emotional lives and everything. They have to bond with each other by putting women down? That’s sad. What about having real friendships? Wouldn’t that be great?

(via http://katbeee.tumblr.com/post/68193182741/to-me-feminism-is-also-about-liberating-men-from )

Davy Jones is the best teen idol of all time.

remembering davy jones

Sure, Ricky Nelson, Frank Sinatra and Elvis predated Davy, and yeah, maybe Leif Garrett and David Cassidy had better hair, and Michael Jackson and Justin Timberlake had more solo success, but Davy is still the best.

Davy Jones represented all that’s great about teen idols. Physically, Davy was all you could ever ask for in a fave rave. Small in stature as to not scare away the young girls, with the prerequisite Beatle haircut (or Prince Valiant do, depending on the year), a youthful face, big doe eyes, and a toothy grin. But he had something that other teen idols of the time didn’t have: a cheeky mischievous sparkle behind those eyes and a rebellious spirit.

Continue reading

One Direction Helping UK Bands Sell Records in America

I was reading this article today about One Direction’s impact on sales for other artists, and how they essentially broke “Talk Dirty” by Jason Derulo in the US and made Little Mix a top 10 selling album and previously, people like Ed Sheeran and Olly Murs have credited them for making their music more popular in America.

I thought it was really interesting to hear how just a single tweet by one of the band members could have such an impact on sales, or in this case, just featuring that Jason Derulo song in their livestream. I always think it’s nice when popular bands try to give props to lesser known bands in order to make them more popular.

In the 1990s a similar thing happened with Oasis and specifically Noel Gallagher, where he had such an impact that any band he mentioned liking became a huge seller (this subset of Britpop that Noel liked was dubbed “Noelrock” and consisted of bands like Cast and Ocean Colour Scene).

In the 1960s, teen magazines wrote a bunch of articles linking Buffalo Springfield to The Monkees after Peter mentioned how much he enjoyed their music, which gave them more of a national profile. A similar thing happened with Tim Buckley and Frank Zappa appearing on their television show.

Nostalgia and Pastiche in Music: Being Derivative Isn’t Always Bad

manufactured

“Now everyone has to be derived from somebody or something. Nothing new is born without parents. Poets stand on the shoulders of earlier poets and musicians, from the long-hair classicists to the long-hair popists, are also links in a chain of influence”

This is one of the best responses I’ve read about the concept of “manufactured” music being inferior to “real music” (what is real music and who decides, I wonder).

A lot of bands are criticized for being manufactured now, but the Monkees got much of the same critique when they came out. I’ve never understood who it was that decided that in order for music to be good and valued it had to completely break from the norms of what went before, so it’s nice to see a music critic in that era say the same thing.

I believe that nostalgia is just as powerful as something totally new. The Monkees obviously borrowed a lot from the Beatles and other successful British Invasion bands, but they also had an undefinable something that made them seem new and fresh, and stand out. That X-Factor, if you will.

A lot of great bands used nostalgia and derivative imagery and sounds in the development of their music and did it with 100% full intent and purpose.

Continue reading

Davy Jones on the Ed Sullivan Show , Feb. 9, 1964

On February 9, 1964: More than 73 million people watched Davy Jones and the cast of Oliver! on the Ed Sullivan Show. The same show also featured the American TV debut of a band called the Beatles. Maybe you’ve heard of them.

Davy recalled: “I was performing a song from Oliver! on The Ed Sullivan Show when the Beatles made their American debut. I saw this amazing reaction and I thought “I want a bit of this- this is good.” I remember getting into the lift with Ringo Starr. I was always a cheeky little guy. He had a cold at the time and I remember saying, “Let me blow your nose for you, I’m closer than you are.” Ringo said, “I know.”